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Two framed cartoons about the Duke of Wellington.


A Kick Up Among the Whigs, by Paul Pry (William Heath). Published by Thomas McLean in January, 1828. A single print framed in a gold moulding. Lithograph. Old colour. Wellington, dressed as a Life Guards officer, scatters other politicians. A satire on the formation of a Tory Ministry by Wellington. George IV laughs in the background.


For information on availability and price, please e-mail:

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The Old White Lion, by H.B. m.p., published July, 1829. Wellington enters a room where a scowling Lord Eldon is sitting. The two had been engaged in a fierce debate over Catholic emancipation. Print size, 11 by 15 inches. Original colour. Framed in a Hogarth moulding. (For a series of cartoons on the Catholic emancipation crisis, please see below.)


For  information on availability and price, please e-mail:

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A selection of 22 unframed, unmounted cartoons from 1829 to 1831, many concerning the political activities of the Duke of Wellington and his most famous achievement - the passage of the Catholic Emancipation Bill in 1829 - and continue until his fall from office in 1830. Most are on thick paper with wide margins, with splendid original colour. The collection is housed in its own purpose-made box with an embossed spine which would grace any library.

Philips (?), Farmer Encombe Setting on the Famous Cumberland Terrier to drag the Great Hanover Rat out of Mischief. Published, March, 1829. Lord Eldon (whose second title was Encombe) was a leading opponent of Catholic Emancipation. The rats, including Wellington, attack laws which protect the Protestant ascendancy.


Jones (?), The Catholic Sovereign Safety-Coach a New Start from the Castle Windsor - A regular Out and Outer. Published April, 1829.


"Paul Pry", W. Heath. A Sketch of the Row in Parliament-Street. Published April, 1829. A street fight between the Duke (r) and a political opponent, Lord Eldon (l). A comment (?) on Wellington's attack on Eldon during a debate in the House of Lords on the Catholic Emancipation Bill.


"Paul Pry", W. Heath, The Man Wot Drives the Sovereign. Published April, 1829. The Duke of Wellington dressed as a driver of a mail-coach. One of a series of cartoons commenting on the pressure exerted by Prime Minister Wellington on King George IV, to accept Roman Catholic Emancipation.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

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"Paul Pry", W. Heath. The Slap-Up Swell Wot Drives When Ever He Likes. Published April, 1829. King George IV, portrayed in a flattering manner. He originally opposed the Emancipation Bill, but was later to be encouraged by Wellington to accept it.


"Paul Pry", W. Heath, The Guard Wot Looks After the Sovereign. Published April, 1829. Lady Conyngham, King George IV's mistress, dressed as a mail-coach guard. She was considered to have important influence over the King, urging him to oppose Emancipation.


"A. Sharpshooter." The man Wot Drives the Opposition. Lord Eldon, dressed as a coachman. Eldon was a leading political opponent of Catholic Emancipation.


"A. Sharpshooter." The Cad Wots Been Appointed Rat-Catcher to the Sovereign. Robert Peel, the Home Secretary, was one of Wellington's closest political friends. Here he is portrayed as a rat catcher.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

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"Paul Pry", W. Heath, Actor of All Work. Published June, 1829. Wellington portrayed as a series of characters from many of Heath's recent cartoons on the emancipation crisis. The Duke's portrayal as an Egyptian mummy is a pun on "mum" - or silence. The Prime Minister was keeping quiet about his tactics on the eve of the opening of Parliament.


A. Sharpshooter. The Cabinet-Maker's Complaint. Published June, 1829. King George IV reacts with surprise at Wellington's request for changes in the cabinet.


HB, A Legal point, or "Cedant Arma Togae." Published August, 1829. Lithograph. Lord Eldon meets with the visiting Wellington to discuss a critical letter the former was meant to have sent. It was found to be a forgery.


"T:J", Jones(?), The Man Wot's Been Made Foreman to the British. Published 1829. Wellington dressed as one of the firemen employed by the London fire insurance companies.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

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"A. Sharpshooter." A patriotic Toast. Published February, 1830. Wellington, Peel, and Lord Lyndhurst (in Chancellor's wig) shown as displaying selfish indifference to national economic distress. SOLD.


HB. A Nocturnal Reverie. Lithograph. Published March, 1830. Wellington, unable to settle to sleep because of the pressure of government business, gazes out of the window. A sympathetic comment on Wellington's apparent inactivity.


HB, Repulsed But Not Discouraged. Published May, 1830. Lithograph. Wellington and Peel resist the efforts of a bearded Jew to enter the House of Commons. At this time, Jews were unable to sit as M.P.s.


HB. A Detected Trespasser. Lithograph. Published July, 1830. Based on a true event: Wellington, walking in the grounds of Windsor castle, is tackled by a servant who tells him to get off the grass. The Duke obeyed. Another sympathetic portrayal of Wellington.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

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Q&HB. The Noodle Bazaar. Published September, 1830. Lithograph. Wellington and Robert Peel inspect a row of portrait heads. They are considering changes to the cabinet and in search of suitable candidates.


HB. A Masked Battery. Published October, 1830. Lithograph. Lord Brougham attacks his political enemies, including the Duke, by hurling ink at them. Brougham had written (anonymous) articles in the "Edinburgh Review."


HB, Guy Fawkes or the Anniversary of the Popish Plot. Published November, 1830. A cheering procession escorts an effigy of Wellington to a place where it can be set on fire. Those in the procession are the Duke's opponents over Catholic Emancipation.


"A. Sharpshooter". Partial Distress, or The Old Cabinet-Maker and his Man Bob Out of Employment. First published, November 1830. Wellington and his political colleague, Robert Peel, are criticised for arguing that the social and economic distress being experienced in the country was only limited in its impact. Both individuals were very rich!


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A. Sharpshooter. The Man Wot Used To Drive The Sovereign. Published November, 1830. King William IV looks sternly towards Wellington whose whip is broken. The Duke has fallen from political power.


Awaiting description!


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

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A second collection of 33 unframed, unmounted cartoons published by Thomas McLean. Many are from McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures from editions between number 15 and 26, the late 1820s and early 1830s. Many deal with the Great Reform Bill crisis. When originally published, their cost was 3/- plain, 6/- coloured - the latter being a substantial sum. All the cartoons are in original colour. They are housed in the purpose-made drawer box shown to the left.

A selection of the cartoons in this important collection:

HB, A Small Tea party of Superannuated Politicians. Published August, 1829. Lithograph. A gathering of Tory stalwarts who had opposed the passage of the Catholic Emancipation Bill. All had lost their political influence by the time this cartoon was published.


HB, Newcastle versus Newark. Published October, 1829. The Duke of Newcastle and Michael Sadler make gestures of dismissal towards an evicted  man and children as they depart. At a by-election for Newark, Sadler, a Tory reformer, succeeded with the help of the Duke. Their objective was to oppose Catholic emancipation.


HB, Alas! Poor Yorick. Published May, 1830. Lithograph. Lord Eldon and the Duke of Cumberland stand as mourners outside the offices of the recently closed Morning Journal which had supported the Tory cause.


HB, Unholy Alliance, or An Ominous Conjunction. Published July, 1830. Lithograph. A scene in the House of Lords, with Lords Cumberland, Durham, Grey, and Eldon whispering together. Eldon leads the plotters. These "Ultra Tories" opposed Wellington as Prime Minister.


HB, A Royal Commission. Published July, 1830. Lithograph. A scene in the House of Lords, where three Lords sit on the woolsack. (Lords Rosslyn, Chancellor Lyndhurst, Lord Shaftesbury.) Here lies the authority to open and prorogue Parliament.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

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A page from McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures. (Top) The Last Scene of Don Giovanni. (Bottom) The Bulls and Bears Alarmed. Backed with.....


.....(Top) Ancient Knights attacking an Hydra. (Bottom) State Paupers. A reflection.

The remaining sheets are printed on thick paper, and on one side only.

Page 2 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.25, 3 January, 1832. (Top, r.) Long Bong Chong Brother to the Moon & Cousin to the Seven Stars... A ferocious looking Chinaman, presumably the Emperor Tao-Kwang, sits enthroned whilst an English trader presents him with money bags. Traders were complaining of hardships and extortion by the Chinese. War was to follow a few years later, in 1839. (Bottom) Rather Alarming or the reception of the new Bill. Four Tories sit eagerly reading the printed text of the new Reform Bill. Peel, an opponent of Reform, stands behind.


The front page of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.26, February, 1832. The Apollo of the Modern Athens Destroying the Hydra. Brougham, as a lanky Apollo, stands on the Woolsack, ready to release his arrows against the monster of Parliamentary Corruption. Three heads still live - those of Cumberland, Newcastle, and Wetherell. Above are the King, as Jove, the Queen, as Juno, and Grey, as Mercury.


Page 2 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.26, February 1832. Six designs dealing with the Reform Bill crisis. King William IV portrayed as a musical conductor; Queen Adelaide sings her protests; Prime Minister Grey stands distraught; Weatherall dressed as a jester; Lord Brougham, dressed in Roman armour, scowls; and a Bull sings in favour of "Re-form, Re-form."


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.26, February, 1832. (Top three rows) The Dernier Resort. A procession of ant-Reformers winds its way, starting top left. The first strip includes members of the clergy, the second members of the House of Lords (including Wellington), and the third, Placemen, Pensioners and Sinecurists. A summary of the interests opposed to Reform.  (Bottom) Hints to sportsmen...


Page 2 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.27, March, 1832. (Top, r.) Scene at a Levee, "Lend me your Ears". Wellington (l.) stands amazed as Cumberland and Gloucester seemingly drag the King from his chair by his ears! The Duke, who had anti-Reform addresses to make, presented them at an inappropriate time - in full levee. (Bottom) Blessed Fruits of the Slave Trade. A comment on the Negro slave revolt in Jamaica. A ferocious Negro, with a gun on his lap, surveys a white woman, decapitated heads, and a burning planter's home.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.28, April, 1832. Debate over the reform of Parliament continues. (Top) The Tories Last Shift. Five Tories engaged in humble occupations. Wellington stitches a pair of breeches. (Below) Prescriptive Rights. John Bull is tightly confined by a long bandage. He is warned by a group of Lords to respect their rights and their property.


Page 4 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.28, April, 1832.The Beggars Opera. Members of both parties drink and smoke in a thieves' alehouse. All listen to Wellington as he argues the need to protect the old system of government.


The front cover from McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.29, May, 1832. A mural monument. The vase in the centre is inscribed with OLIGARCHY and NO REFORM. Wellington (l.) and Lord Eldon (r.) give it their support. Wellington had recently opposed any changes to the voting system which would have allowed more men to vote.


The front cover of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricature, No.30, June, 1832. A Dance Round the May Pole Interrupted by a Passing Storm. The May Pole is placarded as "Reform". Around it dance Prime Minister Grey and his ministers. King William IV provides the music! However, gusts of wind from the mouths of Wellington and other Tories could spoil the fun.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

richardhawes@lancashiregallery.co.uk

Page 2 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.29, May, 1832. The diamond in the centre provides the clue for these cartoons, "The Second Reading in the Lords." (Top, r.) Short Memory. Wellington, with his back to the woolsack, argues against reform. He blames the 1830 revolution in France for the new interest in change. (Top, r.) Candour. Lord Londonderry, to the shock or amusement of his colleagues, denounced Grey for using the King's name in debate. (Bottom, l.) Dr Fullpots Running Over. Bishops in the House of Lords attack the idea of Reform, and the Times newspaper. (Bottom, r.) More Neighbourly than Friendly. Lord Wharncliffe confides to Wellington.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.29, May, 1832. (Top, l.) Horrible Attempt. The Duke of Buckingham throttles a child, representing the Reform Bill).   (Bottom) The Modern Achilles, amidst the learning and wisdom of the country! Wellington, surrounded by a bevy of ladies, peers out of a window. The former make flattering remarks.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.30, June, 1832. (Top, centre) The Political Janus. Wellington, in a fool's cap, argues to the left against reform. A mask, facing the right, maintains he will pass Reform if necessary. (Top, right) One of the Birmingham Union. The Birmingham Political Union, led by Attwood, campaigned hard for reform. The figure is made from those goods the city produced. (Middle, centre) A New Song. A bishop sings dramatically on stage. The bishops were increasingly hated for their opposition to Reform. See...   (Bottom, r.) Emigration of the Surplice (surplus) Population. Four fat bishops are rowed away from the coast, hopefully never to return.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.31, July, 1832. (Top) Scene in a Vestry after a Charity Sermon. Vestrymen entertaining in a luxurious manner. A frequent criticism of the unelected officials of select vestries. (Bottom) Going to the races.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.32, August, 1832. (Top) Russian Policy. The Tsar and his generals in conference. The British government was in the process of organising a huge Russian loan.    (Bottom) Lord H-F-D's fete champetre - with the unique accompaniment of tar barrels. An elegant ball, spoiled by the stench and smoke of burning tar. The fearful disease Cholera was breaking out, and the smell of tar was thought to keep the disease away.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

richardhawes@lancashiregallery.co.uk


Page 2 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.33, September, 1832. (Top, l.) A Man at Arms. Wellington between two attentive ladies. (Centre, middle) Loss of Appetite. John Bull raises a dish cover to reveal.... a Reform Hotchpotch, and not the satisfying plumb pudding as expected. (Centre, r.) The Man Wot Ruins the Publishers. A ragged Brougham hands out copies of The Penny Magazine and the Penny Cyclopedia. (Bottom, l.) Parliamentary Probability. Lord John Russell and Lord Althorp sit in the Commons. Between them emerges a ruffian - a new M.P. - elected under the new franchise.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.33, September, 1832. (Top) Nicholas doing the Amicable. The Tsar fraternises with British sailors on a man-of-war. A fleet had been sent to Russia as a gesture of goodwill. The Emperor went on board to inspect several ships.   (Bottom) Specimen illustrations for a new edition of Lord Byron's works.


Page 4 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 33, September, 1832. The Birth of Political Sin. A scene originating with "Paradise Lost." Wellington stands in the House of Lords surrounded by Tory peers. His speech is against Reform. The peers listen aghast, with Lyndham rising from the woolsack to stare at the Duke.


Page 2 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.34, October, 1832. Patent Penny Knowledge Mill. A satire on the Penny Magazines.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.34, October, 1832. (Top) Four Specimens of Cause and Effect.  Old Corruption displayed..... A fop (l.) maintains "I am a King's Aid-de-Camp, consequently a Colonel." Next, a badly mutilated, elderly soldier, says, "I have no recommendation but hard service, so I am but a Lieutenant." Next, the obese parson claims, "I hold many good Benefices, so I am a Conservative." Finally, a lean parson says, "As my Curacy scarce keeps us from starving, I must say I wish for a reform."   (Middle) Probable effects of the proposed railroad to Brighton. (Bottom) Four specimens of the reading public.


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

richardhawes@lancashiregallery.co.uk


Page 4 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.34, October, 1832. Four comments on forign affairs: (Top, l.) Madrid - A False Alarm. (Top, r.) Dieting in Germany. (Middle, l.) Dutchmen holding up the Navigation of the Scheldt. (Middle, r.) Portugal. (Bottom) Perfects and Imperfects, or dreadful Times. The Times newspaper, represented as the central figure, attacks the Duke of Cumberland. The Duke had recently been accused (in a letter to another newspaper) of riding his horse in a manner which frightened some gentlewomen.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.35, November, 1832. (Top and middle) A Few Tories learning the improvement in the revenue. Conservatives react to the large increase in government revenue. 1, Wetherell, 2. Lyndhurst, 3. Eldon, 4. Wellington, 5. The Devil, 6. Gouldburn. (Bottom) Myn Heer brought to his senses. William I, in an exaggerated Dutch costume, stands terrified between the British lion (l.) and he French eagle (r.) A diplomatic agreement between the British and French was forcing the Dutch to surrender the citadel at Antwetrp.


Page 4 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.35, November, 1832. W.A.R., A Masque. King William IV, as the god Mars, stands dressed in Roman armour in a chariot. The danger of a war against the Dutch was near! The King was sympathetic towards the anti-war party.


Page 3 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.36, December, 1832. (Top) Catching the Mantle of a Lord Chief Justice. Three bewigged lawyers compete for a judge's robes which fall from the sky! It has been thrown by the late Lord Tenterden. (Beneath, l.) Two comments on the new electoral system. Canvassing. A Parliamentary candidate approaches one of the newly enfranchised voters with suspicion. (Beneath, r.) Qualifying. A country yokel comes to cast his vote, pulling the official's nose! 


Page 4 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.36, December, 1832. (Centre) Spying Eastwards from Downing Street to the City.


Page 5 of McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.36, December, 1832. Scenes from an Historical Drama. The Courtship, marriage, & Separation of Mynheer & His Belgian Frow. A sequence of six scenes outlining the troubled relationship between Holland (a man in inflated breeches) and Belgium (a woman wearing a cross on a necklace of beads).


For further information on the collection, please e-mail:

richardhawes@lancashiregallery.co.uk


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Individual pages from McLean's Monthly Sheet of  Caricatures.

Here is a series of individual sheets from McLean's publication. Each can be purchased separately, apart from a famous pair shown below.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.39. [March 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) Scipio discomforting Hannibal 1st  2nd  3th  4th &c. (Bottom, l.) One of the new Irish Judges!! (Bottom,r.) Otium cum digitate.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.39. [March, 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) Schooling "Speak the speech I pray you as I directed." (Bottom) Anticpation "Coming events cast their shadows before Oh"!!!


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.40. [April, 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) Armed with the most extraordinary powers. (Bottom) Remedial measures.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.41. [May, 1833.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. A Parliamentary examination touching certain curiosities in the BRITISH MUSEUM.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.42. [June, 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) Knowing the Whigs by their fruits. (Bottom) The movement party on the move.


For further information on these individual prints, please e-mail:

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McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.43. [July, 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top, l.) The happy free labourers of England. (Top, r.) The wretched slaves in the West Indies. (Bottom) The collision.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.44. [August, 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) Taking care of the spiggot, and neglecting the bung. (Bottom, l.) King Stork. (Bottom, r.) Oh! O! O!


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 44. [August, 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top, l.) A polite smile. (Top, r.) The present attempt to wash the Nigger white. (Middle, l.) A political puzzle. (Middle, r.) The end of poor Mig. (Bottom, l.) The triumph of Mordici. (Bottom, r.) The Great O! in a new character.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.46. [October, 1833.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top, l.) Expensive mouthful. (Top, r.) Sloe (slow) but sure justice. (Middle, l.) The fall of corruption. (Middle, r.) Providing for a brother. (Bottom) Northern geese.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.49. [January, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) If once the pie is opened, won't the birds begin to sing. (Centre, l.) Old Cob grown nervous. (Centre, r.) Icarus. (Bottom, l.) Quartering the quarterly. (Bottom, r.) Petitioning the squiracy for a repeal of the Corn Laws.


For further information on these individual prints, please e-mail:

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McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.51. [March, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. Adhesion!


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.51. [March, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Bottom) “On Stanley On.”


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.52. [April, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) Another peep at the Hannibals. (Centre, l.) Fruits of 1830; or French liberties, 1834. (Centre, r.) Carlist fashion. (Bottom, l.) The unlaid ghost. (Bottom, r.) A British ambassador detained by stress of weather.

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The following two pages are sold as a pair. They show a very famous critical reaction to the activities of the early trade unions and the government's response to them. The top cartoon of the first sheet is frequently reproduced.

McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.53. [May, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) A meeting of the trades' unions. (Bottom) A Sunday "Turn-Out" of the trades' unions.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.53. [May, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) A trades' union committee. (Bottom) Putting down the trades' unions.

The early 1830s saw attempts to form 'general unions' for men of all trades. The most famous was the Grand National Consolidated Trades Union. In 1834, the government attempted to smash the union by arresting six agricultural labourers from the village of Tolpuddle in Dorsetshire (later known as the Tolpuddle Martyrs). These six men, having joined the GNCTU, were accused and found guilty in a show trial of 'administering illegal oaths'. They were transported to Australia.

For further information on this pair of prints, please e-mail:

richardhawes@lancashiregallery.co.uk

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McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.54. [April, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) Jonah, (Bottom) Reading the papers.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.54. [June, 1834.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. The miniature frigate on a cruise.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.55. [July, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) A few thoughts on the musical festival. (Centre) Glorious triumph of a master tailor over the "Rascally Operatives." (Bottom) Effects of the Stamp Acts.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.55. [July, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top) The Wise Men of the East and the Marquis of West----. (Centre, l.) A---P’s boon to the female population. (Centre, r.) Vox Populi. (Bottom, l.) Evidence of character. (Bottom, r.) A recantation.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.56. [August, 1834.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. (Top, l.) Cupid in Kensington Gardens. (Top, r.) Squire Bill looking over his accounts. (Bottom, l.) Equal laws and equal rights. (Bottom, r.) A Westmorland pauper.


For further information on these individual prints, please e-mail:

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McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.57. [September, 1834.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. More amendment of the Pauper Laws.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 60. [December, 1834] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. A Sudden Blow Up!!!


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.62. [February, 1835.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. Oranges and Lemons.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 63. [March, 1835.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. Beginning of the late contest.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 67. [July, 1835.] Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. A Little Man Doing Great Things (with a little assistance.)


For further information on these individual prints, please e-mail:

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McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 66. [June, 1835.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. Comforts of a warming pan.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 69. (September, 1835.) Page size, c.10.5 by 15.5 inches. A Well Known Antique, to the present taste.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 69. [September, 1835.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. Sawney Scot sair besit wi'the Scarlet Leddy.


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 71. [November, 1835.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. The Guy wot blow'd up the Lords!


McLean’s Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No. 71. [November, 1835.] Page size, c.15.5 by 10.5 inches. Valentine and Orson.


For information on these individual cartoons, please e-mail:

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And finally.......


HB, A Friendlly Cannonading. From McLean's Monthly Sheet of Caricatures, No.58. Awaiting further description.


The April Fool Consigned to Infamy and Ridicule, by Williams (?). Published April 1st, 1801. Original colour, unframed. A man stands between two women. He wears a fool's cap, and horns grow from his forehead. The women next to him are labelled Ridicule and  Infamy. The young woman to the right declares, "I have made him a fixed figure for the hand of Scorn to point her slow unmoving finger at." Perhaps an attack on Lord Abercorn, who was nicknamed Bluebeard.


Scotch Harry on his fast trotter on a journey to the north, by Williams (?) Published April 15th, 1805. Original colour, unframed. Melville rides a clumsy horse with a human face away from John Bull, who is blowing a horn. A critical report was thought to see a corrupt politician sent back north of the border. In the end, the journey did not take place!


A Horrid, and Dreadful Account of JOHN MARLEW. A woodcut and type broadsheet of the type which described "horrible murders". n.d., but c. 1830. A father who threw his children down a well and then drowned himself!


The whole sheet.......


..... and part of the verse. Notice the details of the publisher.


One of the most famous SPY cartoons from the middle of the 1880s, The Lobby of the House of Commons. Currently held in a clip frame. SOLD.

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Awaiting description.

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Don't forget (from the Gillray pages): Social Caricature in the Eighteenth Century, by G. Paston. 1905.

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